Global Pairings

Understanding the world, two countries or regions at a time

Sample columns

U.S.-Iran: Two Countries in the Iron Grip of Conservatives by Stephan Richter

France and the United States: A Reality Check by Stephan Richter

Asia’s Scramble for Africa: Who Woos Best? by Shihoko Goto

Australia and China’s New Goddess in White by Tim Harcourt

More Global Pairings columns

Syndication

If you are interested in licensing Global Pairings, please contact our business team.

Specifications

Frequency:
At least weekly, a minimum of 52 editions per year

Length:
Typically 850 words

Use:
Print and online editions

Exclusivity:
Exclusive publishing rights available in many national and regional media markets

Counterintuitive, profound, refreshing — always original

In trying to understand what’s really going on in the world of today, all of us tend to focus on individual nations.

And yet, we have an growing sense that the forces which really shape the future are a multitude of bilateral relationships.

In global politics, these pivotal pairings do not just span across country borders, but also across continents.

In order to capture these fascinating dynamics and to understand the world better, The Globalist has created a new weekly feature series — Global Pairings.

Every week, we present a global pairing in our trademark style, counterintuitive, profound, refreshing — and always original.

Along the way, we cover a stunning array of angles, including security issues, history, diplomacy and the environment.

These features are always thoughtful, but not always geo-strategic. For a good editorial mix, on proper occasion they can also be wistful or whimsical.

What emerges from Global Pairings is a hands-on sense of the real forces shaping the future of the world.

 
The writers of the Global Pairings column were born in Germany, Japan, Russia, India, Ireland, France and Australia.

 

More syndicated columns by The Globalist

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