Globalist Bookshelf

The Globalist’s Top Ten Books of 2010

If you’re looking for the best writing on global economics, politics and culture, our Globalist Bookshelf top ten list is the place to start.

Takeaways



Our top books featured in 2010 on The Globalist Bookshelf:

1. William McDonough & Michael Braungart: Cradle to Cradle
How can we ensure that industry is beneficial to human and ecological health?
2. Patrick Smith: Somebody Else’s Century
Why does the Western world still not understand certain key aspects of Asia?
3. Oscar Guardiola-Rivera: What If Latin America Ruled the World?
In the aftermath of the economic crisis, could Latin America become a new world economic leader?
4. Tony Judt: Ill Fares the Land
How will the economic recession affect the human psyche for generations to come?
5. Vali Nasr: Forces of Fortune
Why are business and interaction the keys to achieving the West’s objectives in the Middle East?
6. Martin Sieff: Shifting Superpowers
What mistakes have U.S. policymakers made when dealing with China and India?
7. Clay Shirky: Cognitive Surplus
How have new media technologies heralded a revolution in the way we think and act?
8. Jonathan Watts: When a Billion Chinese Jump
What is China’s government doing to reverse the effects of climate change?
9. Akbar Ahmed: Journey Into America
How would U.S. society benefit from more true Christianity and less Darwinian thinking?
10. Robert Kaplan: Monsoon
How will the global power base shift from the West to the Indian Ocean in the 21st century?

Honorable Mentions:

1. Richard Duncan: The Corruption of Capitalism
What changes must be made to the financial sector before the U.S. economy can fully rebound?
2. Steven Hill: Europe’s Promise
How can the European economic model be applied to the United States?
3. Jeremy Rifkin: The Empathic Civilization
How will the Third Industrial Revolution allow us to sculpt a new approach to globalization?
4. Simon Tay: Asia Alone
Can the countries of Asia go it alone, or do they still need the United States to keep them connected to each other?
5. Peter Baldwin: The Narcissism of Minor Differences
Are Europe and the United States really as different as is commonly assumed?
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