Special Feature

Top Ten Books on Globalization in 2005

We highlight some of the best books that appeared on The Globalist Bookshelf in 2005.

Best books of 2005.

Takeaways


Thinking about the world — its past, present and future — involves looking at the globe from many different angles. And to help us all on that complex journey, the year 2005 fortunately had many outstanding books to offer. Here is our list of the year’s ten best, including a few honorable mentions.

1. Suketu Mehta: Maximum City — Bombay Lost and Found
What changes — and challenges — does an Indian expat encounter in his former home city?

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2. Kishore Mahbubani: Beyond the Age of Innocence
What can be done to rebuild trust between America and the world?

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3. Tony Judt: Postwar
How does Europe’s recent history continue to inform its present and future?

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4. Pietra Rivoli: The Travels of a T-Shirt in the Global Economy
What can the production and sale of a T-shirt teach us about the global economy?

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5. Rachel DeWoskin: Foreign Babes in Beijing
What is life like for an American expatriate living in China’s capital city?

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6. Christiane Bird: A Thousand Sighs, A Thousand Revolts
Can the world’s largest ethnic group without a state of their own become unified?

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7. Orhan Pamuk: Istanbul
How does Turkey’s most-famous city look through the eye’s of one of its best authors?

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8. Alvaro Vargas Llosa: Liberty for Latin America
How has Latin America’s justice system managed to escape much needed reforms?

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9. Peter Robb: A Death in Brazil
What is life like outside Brazil’s major cities and in its more-remote regions?

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10. Tariq Ramadan: Western Muslims and the Future of Islam
Why do many Islamic communities in the West have trouble adapting?

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Honorable Mentions

Mark Leonard: Why Europe Will Run the 21st Century
How is the European Union’s model going to change global interaction in the 21st century?

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Kenichi Ohmae: The Next Global Stage
How has the breakdown of borders around the globe changed the international business environment?

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Richard N. Haass: The Opportunity
How should U.S. foreign policy adapt to today

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