Author

David Shorr

Program officer in Policy Analysis and Dialogue at the Stanley Foundation

David Shorr is a program officer in Policy Analysis and Dialogue at the Stanley Foundation — a nonprofit, nonpartisan, private foundation focused on promoting and building support for principled multilateralsim in addressing international issues.

He has primary responsibility for the foundation’s programs on the United Nations, U.S.-UN relations and human relief and protection.

Mr. Shorr has spent his career with NGOs — most of them in Washington — whose mission is to promote international peace, human rights and humanitarian action.

Prior to joining the foundation, Mr. Shorr was a project director with the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, where he was responsible for editing “In the National Interest 2001,” the committee’s agenda of human rights policies for the incoming Bush Administration.

During earlier positions with Refugees International and Search for Common Ground, Mr. Shorr was founding organizer of the Great Lakes Policy Forum, which since early 1995 has brought together NGO and government representatives for a monthly discussion of the protracted crisis in Central Africa.

As director of ethnic conflict programs at Search for Common Ground, Mr. Shorr was responsible for dialogue and reconciliation programs in such ethnically polarized societies as Burundi, Macedonia and Bosnia.

He received his B.A. from Brown University and an M.P.A. from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government.

Articles by David Shorr

Make Room for the Rising Powers

Are countries such as China, India and Brazil ready for prime time on the global stage?

September 22, 2010

The UN — Teetering on the Brink?

Is the lack of compromise by UN member states eroding international security?

September 2, 2005

Kofi Annan and George Bush — Finally United?

Is the UN Secretary General adopting a view of freedom similar to President Bush's?

April 11, 2005

Resisting a Vendetta Against the UN

Does the United States share the blame in the UN failures?

December 9, 2004