The Future of U.S. Foreign Policy

A collection of our features on the present and future U.S. foreign policy challenges.

February 11, 2005

A collection of our features on the present and future U.S. foreign policy challenges.

Foreign policy will continue to feature prominent in U.S. President Bush’s second term. Apart from the unfinished business in Iraq and Afghanistan, new security challenges loom in North Korea, Iran and elsewhere. And global terrorism is far from defeated. Our “The Future of U.S. Foreign Policy” series looks at present and future challenges.

Leadership Primacy No More
Can U.S. and UK policymakers maintain their agenda-setting power after Iraq?

By Stephan Richter
U.S. Citizens and Foreign Policy
Gary Hart on why Americans need to be more involved in global issues.

By Gary Hart
Terrorism — A Confusing Target for the United States
Does the United States need a more nuanced approach?

By Justine Rosenthal
Will Americans Ever Care About Foreign Policy?
Are U.S. citizens showing a new interest in foreign affairs policy?

By Peter Goldmark
U.S. Power in the 21st Century
Why will U.S. power continue into the 21st century?

By John Mearsheimer
The POP (=Public Opinion Poll) Superpower
Why is it dangerous to legitimize U.S. foreign policy decisions through opinion polls?

By Stephan Richter
Public Diplomacy in the 21st Century
What factors need to be considered to explain U.S. policy to audiences abroad?

By Joseph Nye
Civilization and Its Enemies
What qualities make the U.S. first among equals in defending civilization?

By Lee Harris