Special Feature

The Globalist’s Favorite Books of 2008

Just in time for the holiday shopping season, what are some of our favorite books of 2008?

See our top books for 2007, 2006, 2005 and 2004.

Takeaways


1. Sarah Burd-Sharps, Kristen Lewis & Eduardo Borges Martins: The Measure of America
For the first time, the United States is analyzed for the Human Development Index.

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2. George Magnus: The Age of Aging
What are the implications of the expected old age bulge in Western nations and the youth bulge in developing countries?

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3. Robin Wright: Dreams and Shadows
How has the Middle East changed over the last decade — and what does the future hold for the region?

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4. David Lida: First Stop in the New World
A panoramic literary portrait of Mexico City — a vibrant, seductive, paradoxical city now commanding the world's attention.

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5. Jasper Becker: City of Heavenly Tranquility
A look at the cost of modernizing Peking, where 1,000 years of priceless history was replaced with high rises.

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6. Edward Alden: The Closing of the American Border
A provocative, behind-the-scenes investigation into the consequences of America’s efforts to secure its borders since 9/11.

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7. Judy Estrin: Closing the Innovation Gap
What will be required to reignite the spark of innovation in business, education and government?

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8. Robert J. Shapiro: Futurecast
How superpowers, populations and globalization will change the way you live and work.

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9. Kishore Mahbubani: The New Asian Hemisphere
One of Asia’s leading intellectuals lays out a global agenda as Western domination ends — and the Asian renaissance impacts world politics, markets and history.

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10. Jeffrey D. Sachs: Common Wealth
Will the 21st century be marked by a shift from acting in national interests to acting in global interests?

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