Globalist Photo Gallery

Aborigines in Australia: Living Off of the Land

Community leader Gordon “Sunno” Mitchell helps hold a local Aboriginal community together in Australia.

Gordon “Sunno” Mitchell, hauls firewood with his nephew and a friend in preparation for winter. (Credit: David Maurice Smith - The Other Hundred)

Takeaways


  • The new photogallery on @theglobalist captures the unique struggle of #aborigines in #Australia in 5 photos.
  • A local community leader seeks to hold his aboriginal Australian community together. #Australia

Awarding-winning Canadian photographer David Maurice Smith bases his operations out of New Zealand. He uses his photography to highlight cross-cultural issues and marginalized communities. His work can be found in many publications including but not limited to the New York Times, Le Monde and the Guardian.

•  •  •

In Wilcannia, a rural district in eastern Australia’s state of New South Wales, traditional culture and the rituals of contemporary life intermix. Many members of the Barkindji Aboriginal community depend upon hunting kangaroos and wild boar to supplement their diets.

A key community figure is Gordon Mitchell, usually known as Sunno, a hunter and mentor to young people who also works at the local school liaising between students’ families and the school board.

To encourage others to eat healthy, traditional foods, he often takes young men from the community out into the country, showing them how to track and shoot animals and live off the land. He hunts to provide meat for his family and the other members of the community, charging just enough money to cover his fuel and other costs.

Text and photographs by David Maurice Smith


DavidMauriceSmith-TheOtherHundred-0015-resize Enlarge   Sunno sits before his home in Wilcannia, one of the most remote communities of New South Wales.

DavidMauriceSmith-TheOtherHundred-0001-resize Enlarge   Children watch intently as Larissa Jones (Left) and Kade Cattermore prepare to blow out candles in celebration of their shared sixth birthday

DavidMauriceSmith-TheOtherHundred-0002-resize Enlarge   An emu (a large flightless bird native to Australia) is placed in the pit filled with hot coals to be cooked on the banks of the Darling river.

DavidMauriceSmith-TheOtherHundred-0007-resize Enlarge   Children play on the newly built community playground. The playground was constructed by the international aid agency Save The Children in 2011.

DavidMauriceSmith-TheOtherHundred-0016-resize Enlarge   An intimate moment between mother and daughter, Freda Bugmy kisses her 6 month old daughter Jacky Bugmy

Awarding-winning Canadian photographer David Maurice Smith bases his operations out of New Zealand. He uses his photography to highlight cross-cultural issues and marginalized communities. His work can be found in many publications including but not limited to the New York Times, Le Monde and the Guardian.

The Other Hundred is a unique photo-book project (order here) aimed as a counterpoint to the Forbes 100 and other media rich lists by telling the stories of people around the world who are not rich but who deserve to be celebrated.

Its 100 photo-stories move beyond the stereotypes and cliches that fill so much of the world’s media to explore the lives of people whose aspirations and achievements are at least as noteworthy as any member of the world’s richest 1,000.

Selected from 11,000 images shot in 158 countries and submitted by nearly 1,500 photographers, The Other Hundred celebrates those who will never find themselves on the world’s rich lists or celebrity websites.

Tags: , , , , ,

Responses to “Aborigines in Australia: Living Off of the Land”

If you would like to comment, please visit our Facebook page.

Privacy Preference Center

Necessary Cookies

The use of certain cookies is required for the site to function correctly.

Advertising

Analytics

Improve content and site performance.

Other