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How Trump Emulates Russia Diplomatically and Strategically

The many signs we overlooked on Trump serving Russia and emulating Russia’s trademark styles.

Credit: Gage Skidmore www.flickr.com

Takeaways


  • We overlooked many signs of Trump serving Russia and emulating Russia’s trademark styles
  • Trump’s diplomacy relies on classic patterns of the diplomatic arsenal of the Soviet Union.
  • The real genius of Russian diplomacy was to have Donald Trump installed as a "sleeper" in American society long ago.

Trump’s diplomacy relies on classic patterns of the diplomatic arsenal of the Soviet Union.

For example, within the framework of the United Nations, it has always played with the simple instrument of the veto (the famous “nyet).

Remember Khrushchev famously pounding his shoes on a speaker’s rostrum? Trump does so, figuratively, every day.

To say only “nyet,” as Trump now does so regularly on behalf of the entire United States, turns out to be a highly effective instrument in the intra-Western context in order to implode established structures.

The real genius of Russian diplomacy, it appears, was to have Donald Trump installed as a “sleeper” in American society long ago.

The signs were there

We could have discovered it early. In order to be successful in the New York real estate industry, one must — in the same manner as the kleptocratic leaders of today’s Russia — be well acquainted with mafia methods.

In addition, Trump’s preference for the opulent, gilded style clearly pointed to his deep affinities for Russia. But we also overlooked this indicator.

Most importantly, in 1987, Donald Trump put up a full-page ad in the New York Times, two months after his first visit to Moscow, a fact that Jonathan Chait just recalled in New York magazine.

In his ad, Trump asked his fellow citizens about the value of their international alliances. The ad’s telling headline was “An open letter from Donald J. Trump on why America should stop paying to defend countries that can afford to defend themselves.”

At a minimum, this was a curious, if not treacherous, way for a playboy well-known in New York to emerge on the national political stage.

Cui bono? Objectively, such a campaign uses Russia the most.

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About Stephan Richter

Stephan Richter is the publisher and editor-in-chief of The Globalist. [Berlin/Germany]

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