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Social Media in China: The Great Distraction

Worried about social media helping to create popular movements, China runs an elaborate system of censorship and manipulation.

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Quo Vadis, China?

Under Xi Jinping, will China opt for a “new totalitarianism,” the current “hard authoritarianism,” turn back to a sort of “soft authoritarianism” or move toward a “semi-democracy”?

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China’s Biggest Political Summit

For all of China’s active global summitry, the most complex diplomatic exercise is entirely domestic – the CCP’s Party Congress, held every five years.

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The US Has to Accept North Korea as a Nuclear Power

We must accept that North Korea is a nuclear power and rely on nuclear deterrence while normalizing relations in the process.

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Troubles in Washington, Troubles in Beijing

The U.S. and China may seem completely out of step – but face many of the same challenges.

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China’s Strategic Caution

China has established a seven-decade-long record of strategic caution and a preference for diplomatic and paramilitary rather than military solutions to national security problems.

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Tillerson in Asia

With its short-term focus on what currently occupies the American mind (North Korea), the U.S. is actually playing into China’s hands in Asia.

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Avoiding War with China

In recent years, many American leaders have grown cavalier about nuclear war, especially with Russia, but there is also risk of a devastating conflict with China.

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East Asia’s Challenge: Resisting Hyper-Nationalism, Not Globalization

Overcoming nationalistic barriers is more urgent than ever for pro-Western Asian countries.

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Hong Kong: China’s Elusive Jewel

Beijing’s approach to Hong Kong is part of the surge in Chinese nationalism engendered by economic success.

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