James M. Dorsey

James M. Dorsey is a senior fellow at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies and an award-winning journalist. [Singapore]

FIFA On Trial: More Evidence of Corruption

Qatar’s World Cup back in the firing line.

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Prince Mohammed’s Latest Gamble

Can the latest Saudi crackdown disarm ever more widespread opposition within the royal family and the military to the reform path and the Yemen war?

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The Kurdish, Iran, Iraq and US Quadrangle

Kurdish battle positions Kurds as US ally against Iran.

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Reforming Saudi Arabia: Easier Said Than Done

What to make of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s recent disavowal of the kingdom’s founding religious ideology?

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Gulf Crisis: Advantage Qatar

How the Gulf crisis and global pressure related to the 2022 World Cup may have induced Qatar’s leaders to launch important reform to advance social change.

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The Saudi Paper Tiger

Far from dominant, Saudi Arabia’s future in the Middle East is that of a second fiddle state.

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Battling for Independence: Small States Stake Their Claim

Beyond the present efforts in Catalonia and Iraqi Kurdistan: How do the strategies of existing small states Singapore, the UAE and Qatar compare?

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Letting Saudi Women Drive

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman imposes his reformist will, while Saudi Arabia’s religious ultra-conservatives lick their wounds.

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How Trump’s Iran Move Plays Into China’s Hands

The U.S. abandoning the Iran nuclear deal is the height of folly. It aligns Iran with China, and away from Europe.

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Toward Kurdish Independence?

The Kurds’ quest for self-rule is potentially explosive. It puts them in the crosshairs of Iraq, Iran, Turkey, Russia and the United States.

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